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20091101
20091130
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Search Results 0 to 15 of about 16 (some duplicates have been removed)
investigative correspondent lisa myers. >> reporter: sharon terrace, who has advocated for people with credit card problems, didn't think it would happen to her. but in the last year citibank hiked her credit card interest rate three times. from 7% to 15%, then to 26%, and now to 30%. >> they want my business because they want to rip me off. and there isn't much that i can do about it. >> reporter: she admits she had a late payment but says the increase hurts a lot because she owes $10,000 on her card. when she called citi to protest, she was told the rate hike was a business decision. the bank needs to make money. >> i wanted to scream at the woman and say, well, you didn't make good business decisions before. we had to bail you out, and now you're making us pay you again. >> reporter: credit card reforms approved in may would outlaw this kind of retroactive rate increase on money consumers have already spent. but congress gave banks until next february to comply with the new rules, and banks have used that time to significantly raise rates. >> the bill is passed. >> reporter: today the hous
. >> troubling either way. >> absolutely. >> this raises so many questions, so let's bring in lisa bloom. good morning, lisa. >> good morning. >> why wouldn't the doctor be forced to have a dna test to prove or disprove the couple's allegations that set biological father? >> well, first there was the civil case and the couple in that case could have asked the judge while the case was ongoing to order a dna test, but that case settled so that disposed of it. then the department of public health came energy understand my reading of their rules they did have the authority to order the dna test and they simply failed to do so. so that's baffling to me. perhaps they knew something that we in the press don't know, perhaps dr. ramaley is not able to have children. i don't know. but it's very hard for me it understand why they would not order him to do the dna test to get to the bottom of had. in anything, to protect other people, other patients in his practice. >> even if he is not the father, he still made a mistake, he in-accept natured this woman with the wrong sperm. are you surprised that there
. lisa ling has a look at efforts to keep the industry clean. >> see? darren james. >> reporter: darren james once led a busy life as a porn star. at the height of your career how many women were you having sex with? >> sometimes it could be ten women in an orgy scene, nonstop. >> reporter: all part of a job darren did successfully for nearly eight years. until 2004 when darren got the call all porn performers dread. >> i get that call, everything stops. i had the virus. my whole world just crashed. >> reporter: so, you don't know how you got infected? >> i don't. >> reporter: did you infect people? >> three girls. i ew them. i felt bad. >> reporter: darren's hiv infection shut down southern california's porn industry for a month. and when his identity as the original infection was made public, he says the isolation that followed drove him to attempt suicide. >> i know porn ain't the best business in thworld but it's all i had. >> reporter: darren is now campaigning to make condom use mandatory in adult film. he predicted years agois infection would not be the last the industry would se
they say there's nothing out of line. here's lisa stark. >> reporter: in a washington, d.c. conference room, experts from around the country gathered to scour for even the smallest clues that the h1n1 vaccine is causing dangerous reactions. dr. bruce gellen is the government's point man for the vaccine and says of the millions who have received the vaccine so far there have been 302 reported side effects. >> mostly sore arms, malaise, fever, things like that. >> reporter: nothing that would raise a red flag to y, oh-oh, this vaccine may not be safe? >> we're looking hard. we have many different systems in place. so far we haven't seen anything that worries us. >> reporter: the government's massive surveillance effort involves cross-checking lists of those who have received the vaccine with any later reports of health problems. data will come from health records from the department of defense, veteran affairs, the indian health service, medicare. and even from private health care plans covering 20 million americans. doctors and the public can also report side effects to a government vaccine
and the eye-opening figures about the number of illnesses and deaths. >> lisa stark reports from pennsylvania where vaccine production is stepping up. >> reporter: the new numbers expected from the centers for disease control today are likely to say some 4,000 americans have now died from the h1n1 flu. that's three times as many as earlier estimates. now, the cdc says that's not because the epidemic is more deadly than thought, but simply that they are recalculating the numbers to get a more accurate picture of the toll of this flu. the new numbers expected from the cdc will be based on a computer model looking at surveillance systems that the cdc uses to track influenza. systems such as hospitalizations, lab testing, and emergency room visits. thbest protection remains the vaccine. and there are still long lines to get it. here at sanofi pasteur, they are working 24 hours a day, seven days a week. this is the only company that is making the h1n1 shot in the united states. and has produced half of the nation's supply so far. sanafi promised 20 million doses by the end of october but delivered
members, his 6-year-old cousin seen here, his twin sisters carla and lisa. we're told she was pregnant. and the 76-year-old auaunt. two others were wounded. it happened in jupiter, a south florida townhome to celebrities like michael jordan and burt reynolds. police tell us is suspect may turn up in mission where they say he -- michigan where he had some contact and there is word that he had a lurid family history. according to reports in 1973, one of his aunts murdered her ex-husband and two children. then days later died of a fatal drug overdose. to california now where folks got so fed up with the crime in their neighborhood, they took things in their own hands. patrolling the streets in the nighttime hours, armed with the flashlights and pepper spray and the local police say it made the difference. casey stegall is live in los angeles with more on how one neighborhood fought back. >> it's safe to say the recession has taken everything to a new level. budget shortfalls all around the country have forced many police departments to take drastic action. taking officers off the street,
to authorities. lisa fletcher has more in ft. collins, colorado. good morning, lisa. >> reporter: good morning, robin. these pleas are part of a plea deal with the prosecutor's office. without it, the charge against richard heene carried a six-year prison term and a $500,000 fine. that said, both the heenes may still face jail time. the heenes will plead guilty this morning to charges related to the most-famous hoax in recent memory. as part of the plea deal, mayumi, a japanese citizen, won't be deported. in an aft, mayumi heene admitted she told her children to lie to authorities and to the media. >> a search is under way for a 6-year-old boy who may or may not have climbed into a homemade helium balloon. >> reporter: it's an image that captivated the country. transfixed and terrified that a 6-year-old boy was sailing across the sky out of control, in an experimental weather balloon. parents called police. and it set in motion an exhaustive search by land and sky. even a military blackhawk helicopter deployed. all at a cost of $55,000. when the balloon was finally grounded, no boy. hours late
in 1936. total square footage for each unit is about 925 square feet. we're gonna go over to lisa's 'cause her birthday's monday. clay paid 526 grand for both units in the duplex. i'd like to think that i've kept with the period feel to the house. i feel like it's a very modern look with a little bit of a retro flavor to it. now clay's home is valued at $750,000. this is the first home that i've purchased, so initially, i was extremely nervous, and now i'm very happy to say i feel like it was a wise purchase. i feel very lucky to have the life that i have in a home that i really enjoy being in. now let's head to key west and see what you can snag for $750,000. (both) welcome to key west. after renting five different homes, patrick tierney decided to put down roots by buying this fixer-upper a mile and a half from the heart of key west. he shares this tropical retreat with his partner viktor slavov. i think our home says and sort of sells island life. the house is basically about 1,500 square feet, 3 bedrooms, 2-bath. patrick paid just 110,000 bucks for his place, but it took another 200 gr
help lisa pfund says she never imagined her daed, amber, who was shot in the stomach, could be wounded while on a military base in her own cup. >> she said soldiers are supposed to help the other people. >> reporter: some of the relatives of the shooting victims have complained they haven't gotten enough information about the conditions of their loved one, but those who were brought here have been taken to a private area of the hospital. the hospital as a whole has been closed temporarily to the public. and very little information is coming out. we do understand that at least four of the shooting victims were in operating rooms last night and some are in critical care. harry? >> kelly cobiella in temple, thanks so much. we'll have a lot more on this story in just a little while. i want to go back to, no, get a check on our nation's weather. dave is standing by. >>> good morning. 14 minutes past the hour. let's see what's happening all across the country. most of the country looking picture perfect today weather-wise with the exception of the pacific northwest where we're seeing some ra
Search Results 0 to 15 of about 16 (some duplicates have been removed)